Category Archives: Tai Chi

Tai Chi for Healthy Aging – fall 2016

Tai Chi for Healthy Aging, fall 2016 session 1, is open for sign-ups! First class is Sep 12.

The class, which uses tai chi, a Chinese martial art that uses slow, mindful movements, is open to ambulatory adults, including people in chairs. The class aims to teach participants to view falls and fear of falling as controllable; to set realistic goals for increasing mobility and activity; to foster greater understanding of fall risk factors; and to increase strength and balance through exercise.

The class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:30–11:30a, in The Landing, UMF Olsen Student Center, weeks of Sep 12, 19, 20, Oct 3, plus Oct 12 (no class Oct 10). Interested participants must register in advance by visiting the UMF FRC front desk at 152 Quebec St., Farmington. Class is limited to 20 participants. Class is free for UMF FRC members (excluding the HT pass because of pass restrictions) and $30 for nonmembers.

Two more sessions will follow. The class is cumulative, however, so it is recommended that you start from the beginning and proceed through to the end. Session 2 runs the weeks of Oct 17, 24, 31, Nov 7; and session 3 runs the weeks of Nov 14, 21, 28, Dec 5 (no class Nov 23).

This video shows program creator Fuzhong Li leading a “Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance” instructor training in 2010, an “evidence-based Tai Chi program for falls prevention, based on his research.”

Tai Chi for Healthy Aging, Jan-Feb 2016

Registration is open for TWO possibilities for Tai Chi for Healthy Aging!

UMF (Farmington, ME) > Mon and Wed, Jan 4 to Feb 24, 2016 (NO CLASS 1/18 and 2/15), 10:30–11:30a, The Landing. Sign up at front desk, UMF FRC, $75 nonmembers, free members. Class minimum: 5 (already met). Class limit: 15.

I’l B Fit (Rumford, ME) > Tue and Thu, starting Jan 5, 2016, 9–10a. Sign up with Cindy or Ivy, $30 for 6-class block. Class minimum: 5 (not yet met). Class limit: 15.

The class uses a simplified, modified form of tai chi to work with the 60-and-over population on balance. The class may be performed entirely seated.

Tai Chi for Healthy Aging

I attended classes at Brookline Tai Chi to prepare to teach Tai Chi for Healthy Aging. I am currently offering the class on a trial basis at the UMF Health and Fitness Center, Farmington, Maine; and at I’l B Fit, Rumford, Maine. I will post again when the new sessions begin and enrollment opens. I have received good feedback and am excited to continue the course; progress with the students; and work with the ambulatory over-60 target population.

The class, which uses a simplified form of tai chi, a Chinese martial art that uses slow, mindful movements, is open to ambulatory adults, including people in chairs. The class aims to teach participants to view falls and fear of falling as controllable; to set realistic goals for increasing mobility and activity; to foster greater understanding of fall risk factors; and to increase strength and balance through exercise. Since 2010, Brookline Tai Chi has offered the course in collaboration with Dr. Fuzhong Li, Oregon Research Institute, to create an evidence-based fall-prevention protocol.

Here’s a promotional video from 2010 with more information. (Please note that the students are performing relatively advanced moves! But it looks really cool, doesn’t it?)

Tai chi master class

The Farmington tai chi practice group is sponsoring a workshop from noon to 4 PM on Sunday, September 18, 2011, in the Bass Room, Farmington Memorial Hospital. Guest instructor Dan Kleiman will join local instructor Catherine Chenoweth in guiding participants through the wu style short form. The cost is $45.

Tai chi, also known as tai chi chuan, a Chinese martial art, is characterized by slow, flowing movements. The wu style short form is foundational and takes just a few minutes to execute once it has been learned. Practicing its slow movements is a form of relaxation and meditation. The Farmington tai chi practice group, which comprises beginners and more experienced practitioners, meets weekly on Wednesday evenings to learn and practice parts of the short form.

“Tai chi is known as a moving meditation,” said Iris Silverstein, a founding member of the practice group who studied tai chi for two years at Brookline Tai Chi. “The movements require you to focus and slow down.” She restarted tai chi practice within days of a recent hip replacement and credits it with helping her to quickly increase mobility and balance. Participant Maggy Wyckoff agreed about the health benefits of tai chi, noting that it helps her with balance and strength without damaging her knees.

Guest instructor Dan Kleiman, who has studied tai chi since 1998, is director of Brookline Tai Chi, one of the largest health-oriented tai chi schools in the country. Kleiman noted, “What I love about tai chi is the way that the health benefits are intertwined with the meditative aspects. It’s fun to help people relax and reconnect to their bodies.”

Catherine Chenoweth, an instructor who leads classes in Stratton, Kingfield, and Farmington, has studied tai chi since 1997. She was an assistant instructor at the Taoist Arts Center in New York City for more than two years before moving to Maine. “The slow and gracefully flowing movements of tai chi offer a different and exciting approach to exercise,” Chenoweth said. “Once the movements of the five-minute form are learned, students advance by learning deeper and more subtle layers within the form, rather than moving on to more difficult or athletically challenging moves. The potential that is in these movements never stops unfolding.”

Participants of all ages, fitness levels, and experience are welcome. Preregistration is not required. Hospital employees will receive a discount, and need-based discounts are also available.